At a Glance

Almost everyone is quick to say to not judge a book by its cover, however, does that mean we aren’t judged just because we shouldn’t be? My school has a uniform policy, khakis and collared shirts. I suppose it’s hard to not look remotely professional in that attire, unless of course I’m wearing cargos and a hoodie over my polo. Other students seem more comfortable when I wear that. I blend in and go unnoticed, and sometimes, that’s how I like it. When the hoodie comes off and my shorts, or pants in this case since it’s cold, become less baggy and more fitted, a few people notice, teachers look at me for answers rather than questions. Occasionally when I answer my Girly side and wear a skirt and blouse with flats, maybe a ribbon in my hair, a lot of people look. I’m different from the crowd. When I wear a skirt, I no longer do it for solely my Girly side. Now, a skirt (not a short one, just a skirt) is a “I’m kind of down today and turning a few heads would make it a better day” kind of thing. Today, I’m wearing a blazer. I look professional. I anticipated the more laid back students would feel odd talking to me if they didn’t know me. I look like I have somewhere to be, something to do, and they don’t know how to react. I expect teachers will turn there heads today, grow more fond of me, that never hurts. I’m eager to find out. Everything I wear will result in a different reaction. Before I have a chance to do anything, to say anything, I am judged by my attire. We live in a world of hypocrites, hypocrites and fabrics that define you.